Choices

Think about the choices you make each day – what to eat, what to wear, how you will spend your time. Oftentimes, you have multiple options. Here in the United States, most of us have choices between wants, not needs. But in countries like Nicaragua, that is often not the case. Young university women are faced with choices such as, “Do I spend money on a taxi to safely get to my destination, or do I walk tonight so that I have enough money for a meal?”  

The students in the Adelante Mujer program do not have to make that decision. Our program offers them funding for transportation to the hospital for on-site training and for a meal when they are on campus. Our program helps relieve some of the financial worries of these women who desire to serve the people of their communities. We fund them, not just to be doctors, but to be excellent doctors!

We have just started receiving applications for Adelante Mujer for the first semester of 2022. The process includes an online application, submission of grades, and an interview. In this process, we ask the women why they choose to study medicine. One applicant shared, “Giving support to people who need it most, for me to help society, is a dream and it gives me satisfaction when I can give them answers.”  Another shared, “Since I was little my dream has been to be a doctor, I have always liked to help everyone I can. My region needs more (medical) people available, and I want to be one of them.”  She goes on to talk about her hopes beyond initial medical school and our program to say, “I want to be a cardiologist so that people from my region no longer have to travel to the Pacific coast or other places to be seen by a specialist.”

Women in Adelante Mujer are making choices to help their community. Their choices are not made lightly. They are committing to six years of study, one year of internship, and two years of service, with more study for those who choose to specialize. And their choices are making a difference for themselves, their families, and their nation.

Karen – November 2021 

 

 

Where Have All the Doctors Gone?

We can proudly tell you where one of the Adelante Mujer doctors has gone and what she has accomplished. On March 26 a member of the first graduating class of Intercultural Medicine and of Adelante Mujer earned her title as Pediatrician from UNAN University in León, Nicaragua. Her letter below describes her gratitude. Each and every donor can celebrate her success which may not have been possible without your help. 

Hello. I am Joice. I was part of the Adelante Mujer program almost from the beginning and with its support I was able to conclude the Intercultural Medicine career of URACCAN University. I have so much to thank for and I have so many memories of Adelante Mujer.  

 

I still remember the day I arrived at the interview with Sister Ann McKean. I remember that Sister Ann thought I could be her interpreter because my friend Ana, who also was coming to ask for support of Adelante Mujer, told Sister Ann that I could interpret for us. That was a moment that caused us all to laugh. I do know some English but I could not be an interpreter!                 Continue reading “Where Have All the Doctors Gone?”

Sixty-One Doctors and Counting

Several years ago when Sister Ann McKean, CSA, PhD and I were talking with Dr. Manuel Salas about the goals of Adelante Mujer, we asked how many doctors Nicaragua would need. Thirty? Fifty? About how many? His reply was simple. “We will never have enough;  there is such a terrible shortage.”  “All right,” we decided, “Adelante Mujer will continue to provide financial assistance to women medical students for as long as God and our donors help us.”

On March 24, 2021 another glorious success of Adelante Mujer’s mission became a reality. Seven industrious students pronounced the Hippocratic Oath to become devoted physicians.

 

 

 

The Promotion Ceremony begins with the formal introduction of each student and her escort. Here Jenny and her father are announced as they enter the assembly. Continue reading “Sixty-One Doctors and Counting”

The Good News and the Sad

The Good News 

Donors sometimes ask about former medical students who became doctors.  Well, after they pronounce the Hippocratic Oath the new doctors spend one year as interns who work in the local hospital or in local clinics.  Following the internship, they are required to spend the next two years in “social service” which is a partial payment to the government for the government’s contribution to the cost of their medical education.  The total of nine years is culminated by the presentation and defense of a research paper required by URACCAN University.   Continue reading “The Good News and the Sad”